by ronen May 21, 2013

erikbernhardsson:

 

a job for the artist which no one else does is to dismantle existing communication codes and to recombine some of their elements into structures which can be used to generate new pictures of the world.

- victor burgin: work and commentary (1973).

(via notational)

“Pretentious” is one of those adolescent words that decodes as “your act of ambition makes me uncomfortable.”

aleskot:

— Warren Ellis

(via mercurialblonde)

by hydeordie March 5, 2010
sympathyfortheartgallery:

(via dethjunkie)
You must be the kind of man who can get things done. But to get things done, you must love the doing, not the secondary consequences.

Ayn Rand

#Actioners

(via ronenreblogs)

To live a creative life, we must lose our fear of being wrong

Joseph Chilton Pearce

(via teresanasty)

(via ronenreblogs)

by themadeshop February 21, 2010

‘The point,’ people say self-righteously, and condescendingly, when you ask why their art looks like crap ‘is to make people think.’

The goal of academic contemporary art seems to be to make the gallery just like a church: a place where dutiful people can go once a week to get so bored that they grow introspective.

Zak Smith (via zucherman)

braincraft:



you don’t stop making things because you get old, you get old because you stop making things



blakeley:

hydeordie:

The American Paradox

In a survey of attitudes toward artists in the U.S. a vast majority  of Americans, 96%, said they were greatly inspired by various kinds of art  and highly value art in their lives and communities. But the data suggests  a strange paradox.
While Americans value art, the end product, they do not value what artists do. Only 27% of respondents believe that artists contribute “a lot” to the good of society.
Further interview data from the study reflects a strong sentiment in the cultural community that society does not value art making as legitimate work worthy of compensation. Many perceive the making of art as a frivolous or recreational pursuit.
Other insights further illuminate the depth of the paradox:

• A majority of parents think that teaching the arts is as important as reading, math, science, history, and geography.
• 95% believe that the arts are important in preparing children for the future.
• In the face of a changing global economy, economists increasingly emphasize that the United States will have to rely on innovation, ingenuity, creativity, and analysis for its competitive edge—the very skills that can be enhanced by engagement with the arts.


I am extremely intrigued in this paradox of the value of art/artists. Further exploration is required.

Duh, it’s because most artists suck.

blakeley:

hydeordie:

The American Paradox

In a survey of attitudes toward artists in the U.S. a vast majority  of Americans, 96%, said they were greatly inspired by various kinds of art  and highly value art in their lives and communities. But the data suggests  a strange paradox.

While Americans value art, the end product, they do not value what artists do. Only 27% of respondents believe that artists contribute “a lot” to the good of society.

Further interview data from the study reflects a strong sentiment in the cultural community that society does not value art making as legitimate work worthy of compensation. Many perceive the making of art as a frivolous or recreational pursuit.

Other insights further illuminate the depth of the paradox:

• A majority of parents think that teaching the arts is as important as reading, math, science, history, and geography.

• 95% believe that the arts are important in preparing children for the future.

• In the face of a changing global economy, economists increasingly emphasize that the United States will have to rely on innovation, ingenuity, creativity, and analysis for its competitive edge—the very skills that can be enhanced by engagement with the arts.

I am extremely intrigued in this paradox of the value of art/artists. Further exploration is required.

Duh, it’s because most artists suck.

ronen-v:

from Art Basel Miami 2k9
(outside the Converse Party)

ronen-v:

from Art Basel Miami 2k9

(outside the Converse Party)

by hydeordie December 8, 2009
nudawn:

peterwknox:

laidbare:rach:


Lilly McElroy’s “I Throw Myself At Men” project is now up at the online gallery WIPNY—and I love it. It’s exactly what it sounds like, but here is the artist’s statement:

I am, at the moment, part projectile and part foolish romantic. These images are documents of a hopeful and violent gesture, a demand that the possibility of a connection exist. The men often look terrified or at least slightly surprised. My role as aggressor is clear and I think my leaps acknowledge the basic human desire for contact.
To date, there have been no major injuries.



There are 14 other photos just like this one. Great.

Basically, art is…. you can do whatever the fuck you want as long as you call it ART.

nudawn:

peterwknox:

laidbare:rach:

Lilly McElroy’s “I Throw Myself At Men” project is now up at the online gallery WIPNY—and I love it. It’s exactly what it sounds like, but here is the artist’s statement:

I am, at the moment, part projectile and part foolish romantic. These images are documents of a hopeful and violent gesture, a demand that the possibility of a connection exist. The men often look terrified or at least slightly surprised. My role as aggressor is clear and I think my leaps acknowledge the basic human desire for contact.

To date, there have been no major injuries.

There are 14 other photos just like this one. Great.

Basically, art is…. you can do whatever the fuck you want as long as you call it ART.